GONG Yoo, betrayed and abandoned by the North Korean government, will do anything to find his family and uncover a national conspiracy in WON Shin-yun’s THE SUSPECT

GONG Yoo, betrayed and abandoned by the North Korean government, will do anything to find his family and uncover a national conspiracy in WON Shin-yun’s THE SUSPECT

A tale of two Koreas, North and South, “The Suspect’ is a complicated story of corruption, treachery, and manipulation of both sides by an evil (of course) puppetmaster. Throw in human trafficking, a journalist in pursuit of the truth, the puppetmaster’s pursuit of a weapon that turns out to be not a weapon, but a (spoiler alert) “gift.”

The two opposing badasses, former comrades with a conscience and a moral code, get tired of taking orders and finally take matters into their own hands.

Dong-chul (GONG Yoo) is the best field agent in North Korea – until he is abandoned during a mission, his wife and daughter missing.

Hunted and on the run, torn between grief and vengeance, he takes a job as a night driver for the CEO of a powerful corporation. The chairman is brutally assassinated – but gives Dong-chul a pair of glasses before he dies.

Now, he’s on the run again. Accused of murder, wanted for treason, and desperate to uncover the volatile national secrets hidden inside the glasses.

Dong-Chul wants the truth. And he’ll start a war to get it.

Much has been said of this being a “Bourne Identity” rip-off, but it’s not. That’s the closest thing it can be compared to for American audiences. The cinematography is breathtaking, especially at the end of the movie, but American audiences unfamiliar with the history of recent Korean history will likely find this a hard movie to get into.

For one thing, it’s longer than our usual 90 minute attention span is used to. It’s a full 137 minutes, and if you look away you will have to think fast to catch up. “The Suspect” is full of fantastic fight and chase scenes, not as abbreviated as American audiences are used to, almost played out in actual real time, but spectacular nontheless. There’s a scene where Gong Yoo his hanging by his neck. It looks like he literally dislocates his arms to get out of that, and it’s not CGI. He must be a contortionist.

Best seen on DVD, to stop and start at will.

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